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Silly supremacists

Supremicists are pathetic. White supremacists may be the most notable of the breed. Their websites are loaded with scary-looking skulls and lightning bolts, but their prose is barely literate and their “proofs” of their superiority tend to be long-ago debunked books and transparently bogus “scientific evidence.”

They operate in cells of one (or two or three) not because it’s a wise security measure but because they can’t get along with each other for 10 minutes. And much of their semi-literate ranting consists of denunciations of each other.

Not one of these “superior” beings has made a single impressive accomplishment in any area of endeavor — except, rarely, murder. Which gets headlines but fails to impress as a great work of humanity.

But they are far from the only variety of supremacist, and all of them are pathetic.

—–

My dad was a male supremacist — a common thing in those days. A lot of my friends’ fathers were similar. He sneered at all women, and any time a woman did something he didn’t approve, it had to do with being female.

If a male driver did something stupid, it was because he was a dumbass or a jerk. If a woman driver did the same thing, it was because she was a woman.

All women were terrible with money. Never mind that when my weary mother finally handed the household finances over to Dad after years of belittlement, he took us from an ordinary working-class existence to the brink of bankruptcy in months.

All men were stronger, better, and smarter in every way than all women. Yet somehow, women were always able to control men.

God (whom Dad otherwise paid very little attention to) gave all men divine authority to rule over all women and children. Those women and children who didn’t submit were “unnatural.” Dad never realized he possessed absolutely no leadership ability, forcing my mother to organize the family and driving us kids into subterfuge (sis), avoidance (bro), or rebellion (me).

That he resorted to violence to prove his superiority was a tragedy. It got plenty of notice. But it failed to impress.

—–

Now it seems we’re developing a class of female supremacists, mostly headquartered in academia where it’s very easy to think of yourself as a superior being.

So far, their pronouncements are focused more on how bad men and boys are are — rapists, excluders, insensitive, inherently violent, in need of being tightly controlled by the female-led bureaucracies of schools or the mighty hammer of law and regulation. Few of these self-righteous, hate-filled pronunciators are explicitly touting their own superiority as females.

But focusing on the badness of the “other” is the same as proclaiming your own superiority. Just a matter of emphasis.

Fortunately, I haven’t gotten close to too many of these female supremicists, but certainly the ones who’ve gotten the most press — from the early MacKinnon-Dworkin complex to the current crop of mattress-toting or wolf-crying rape claimants — also fail to impress.

—–

Would have been nice had the feminist movement of the 70s ended up empowering both men and women. Would have been great to see us all free to be more ourselves, to take on the roles we’re personally best-suited for and happiest with, regardless of stereotypes. That’s happened to a certain extent, though women have benefited far more than men. And it seems too often that, rather than sharing and enjoying personal power, empowering women has discouraged and (dare I say) unmanned men.

Now it’s sad to see men falling from economic and social grace while female supremacists try to push the guys down even farther.

—–

On a related topic …

I woke up this morning to a pronouncement from Commentariat member KiA that my “… course of actions regarding the xtera make some sense only when filed under Female.”

KiA didn’t deign to provide enlightenment re how my attempts to fix the Xterra are estrogen-overdosed and testosterone-deficient. I’ve asked him to clarify that.

His comment made me laugh. But it also got me started on this topic because it reminded me of Dad. And cars. I could tell you — oh could I tell you! — about the times my young-adult self visited my parents, arriving in a perfectly functioning vehicle, only to find it dead when I went to leave. Because Dad had read something in Popular Science and wanted to “improve” my car’s engine.

I could tell you about the childhood expedition where Mom and a carload of kids ended up stranded in the mountains in a car with a cracked block. Mom had implored Dad to take the car to a shop for problems it was having. He told her he had done so when he’d actually attempted some cheap make-do repair himself.

I could tell you and tell you and tell you stories like that. Plenty of testosterone. Divine superiority. No common sense. Disaster.

And all because Dad felt he had to do “the things a man does” even when experience should have told him not to do them. All because he’d been raised in a culture of male supremacy and spent his whole sad life feeling like he had to live up to a certain arbitrary standard of “maleness,” no matter what perfectly awful result it achieved.

—–

I am most gratefully grateful for the Commentariat members (mostly, but not exclusively, male) who’ve given advice on the Xterra. I long ago gave up the notion that being equal means being the same. I say thank heaven and glory halellujah for the guys who are better at fixing mechanical things, reasoning out problems, or staying calm in a crisis than I. I wish I’d realized decades ago that many guys really like to help others (esp. women) to solve problems. Or to step in like white knights to do the solving for us.

There are plenty of things guys tend (note: tend) to be better at than women. And vice versa. (You guys can write in snow but we can have babies.) But I am thrilled — for both we estrogen-dominants and you testosterone-dominants — that none of us have to work so hard at “proving” we’re sufficiently masculine or feminine any more. I’m glad the illusion of male supremacy has mostly died out. And I hope — again for all our sakes — that the current attempt at female supremacy fails as miserably as my Dad’s car repairs.

27 Comments

  1. Brad R
    Brad R June 30, 2015 1:35 pm

    For what it’s worth, I did not comment on your Xterra problems because those automotive contraptions are a mystery to me, too. We have a very good independent mechanic we’ve been using for over a decade.

    I wish I could remember who said this, that I’m fond of quoting: “For every job, there is a correct tool. The correct tool to fix a television is a television repairman.”

  2. Joel
    Joel June 30, 2015 1:46 pm

    It does seem as though supremacy is the quest of certain sorts of small minds. The biggest takeaway I got from this busy news week is the way gay activists finally got their federal nod to gay marriage, much good may it do them, and immediately – virtually without breaking stride – turned on their most likely resistors and demanded tax punishment. I’d have thought “Let us show you how little you have to fear from this change” would have been a better approach, but no. The “victim” never seems to want simply to stop being a victim – he goes straight for being a tyrant.

  3. Claire
    Claire June 30, 2015 2:59 pm

    “The “victim” never seems to want simply to stop being a victim – he goes straight for being a tyrant.”

    Word. I’ve always been sympathetic to gay rights, but the spectacle of the court victors and their supporters immediately turning on churches has been sickening. And dismaying. These people think they smell blood in the water. They seem to have no idea they’re provoking a literal culture war.

    OTOH, I’ve always thought that tax breaks for churches violated the establishment clause — and even moreso when “liberal” churches are selectively allowed to be political and still tax exempt when “conservative” churches aren’t.

  4. Claire
    Claire June 30, 2015 3:00 pm

    “For every job, there is a correct tool. The correct tool to fix a television is a television repairman.”

    Preach it, Brothah Brad!

  5. Bob Adkinson
    Bob Adkinson June 30, 2015 3:38 pm

    “(You guys can write in snow but we can have babies.)”

    How you going to make babies without the snow writers, and who’s going to be impressed with the snow writing if not the baby makers? That’s what I’d like to know. 🙂

    Sorry for your formative experiences, but then, I’m sorry about a lot of mine, too. Life’s funny, ain’t it?

  6. Claire
    Claire June 30, 2015 3:40 pm

    “How you going to make babies without the snow writers, and who’s going to be impressed with the snow writing if not the baby makers? That’s what I’d like to know. :-)”

    Precisely! We’re all in this together and vive la difference! and all that. The notion of either sex somehow being superior or supreme is nasty.

  7. Jim B.
    Jim B. June 30, 2015 3:48 pm

    Every repairs I’ve done was done only after some research, mostly light stuff. The smart part would be to know what you can’t do. Lacking either the knowledge or more likely the specialized tools.

    Once I’ve repaired my expensive floor model HDTV after noticing to power light seems to be blinking a certain number of times. Turns out it was a self diagnosing thing and I found out what it meant. Tracked down the part needed and replaced it. Turns out my TV has only four computer boards. While it would be nice to hunt down the actual part that’s busted. It’s easier to just replace a board. Cheaper than having a repairman do it.

    The point is this: I did nothing anyone (and I mean ANYONE) else can do. Figure it out. Especially made much easier by the Internet.

    On another note regarding abilities, hit this link, loved the subjects’ conversation about the Bronco’s carburetor.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/an-astronaut-two-trucks-and-his-wife-1435069610

  8. jed
    jed June 30, 2015 4:15 pm

    You could write in the snow, with some practice. Well, you could do it without practice too, depending on how much you value legibility.

    Uh … so, here are some nice photographs.

  9. Ellendra
    Ellendra June 30, 2015 6:07 pm

    “But focusing on the badness of the “other” is the same as proclaiming your own superiority.”

    Binary mindset. If not A, then B. Therefore to promote B, tear down A.

    The binary mindset is the basis for our entire socio-political system.

  10. RustyGunner
    RustyGunner June 30, 2015 6:32 pm

    Make me a sandwich, woman.

  11. RustyGunner
    RustyGunner June 30, 2015 6:33 pm

    Cue “Poof! You’re a sandwich!” Response in 3…2…1…

  12. Claire
    Claire June 30, 2015 7:32 pm

    I think the proper command is, “Fetch me a brew, wench.” (The “make me a sandwich” line can indeed be perilous.)

  13. FishOrMan
    FishOrMan June 30, 2015 8:21 pm

    Well, it’s my theory all this man-hating has driven more males out of the system. With less men involved, it stands that less testosterone will be involved as well. Does that give the influence of estrogen a more pronounced effect? Have we already seen this increased influence? Does estrogen allow for more nanny government and less independence? Couple that with possibly less violence, (including righteous violence from those oppressed), leaves me to wonder if this shift toward female will add to the decline? Or maybe, women will take a far more defensive stance toward government abuses and violence will come sooner??? And no, their isn’t a superior sex, but there most certainly is differences between the sexes. How those difference effect the system we will continue to find ourselves under is most interesting.

  14. LarryA
    LarryA June 30, 2015 9:41 pm

    And no, their isn’t a superior sex, but there most certainly is differences between the sexes.

    Herewith LarryA’s Theory of Woman:
    For a man to understand a woman, he must understand curves.

    Not those curves. They’re for admiring. Bell curves.

    Calculate two curves on any characteristic, for instance sports competitiveness, one for men, one for women. Most men and most women will fall toward the middle. But in this case the curves will be different, in that more men than women tend to be competitive in sports. So the average man is more competitive than the average woman, hence the “difference” between the sexes.

    But on each curve, only a few people in the middle are “average.”

    You’ll find me down on the low end of the male curve. I stumbled into a lifetime hobby of music because in junior high I discovered I could get out of PE by taking choir. I’m probably less sports-competitive than almost all women. OTOH I know some ladies who shoot Olympic-level shotgun. They’re way high on the female curve, far more sports-competitive than almost all men.

    So while the statistical differences between average men and women may be academically interesting, it doesn’t tell me squat about the particular woman I’m about to talk to. For that, I need to remember she’s a unique individual.

    This is where both “masculinists” and feminists fail. They can’t see past their images of men and women to look at us as people.

  15. Pat
    Pat July 1, 2015 1:31 am

    Herewith, one female’s POV:
    It is indicative of Feminism that feminists want to Be Like Men (their idea of “equality”) – at the same time blaming men for the state of the world. That discrepancy has been going on for 45 years, and has now extended into the U.N. and WHO, as well as the Body Politic of many countries.

    I believe it was never about getting out from under the thumb of patriarchy, and away from stereotyping (though that was the stated reasoning), but all about being in political control. The original concept of Women’s Lib was a cover-up for “Now it’s our turn.” This from the “leaders” of feminism – not from the average woman around the world who did envision equality of opportunity and real freedom from boring lives or one-dimensional relationships.

    Re: influence, feminism has succeeded. Judging from the results of that influence, feminists have not improved conditions or relationships, but made them worse.

    It’s been said, and I believe it, that woman’s anger is far worse than man’s; once aroused there’s nothing she won’t do to exact vengeance. Estrogen is far deadlier in the arena than testosterone – men merely kill, while women taunt and twist the knife, and throw pieces of their hate back in the face of the enemy before killing.

    This is what’s happening today with political correctness. Being “offended” and establishing “safe houses”, giving deference to girls’ importance and studies in school, attempting to reverse the traditional roles of male and female (even reversing how boys and girls are dressed, as in Italy. And why would a woman *want* to sign up for combat duty?), re-defining rape to approaching any female for any reason. All of this is designed to belittle the role of males in society, and belittle their worth in general.

    The difference in males and females is obvious, not just in looks but often in how we think, how we approach and solve problems, and even how we cope with each other. History, as well as genetics, has lent a hand in what we are.

    But feminists refuse to consider those differences while excoriating men for being different. They emulate men’s goals without admitting that men have anything worth pursuing. To replace Patriarchy, they offer us… Matriarchy. Pure politics!

  16. mary in texas
    mary in texas July 1, 2015 6:25 am

    My husband thought our daughter should be able to do small car-related tasks. In college she changed her own tire to the shock of her roommate’s boyfriend (Why didn’t you call me? Because I could do it.). Also she drew a crowd at the parking lot of her apartment complex when she checked the oil. None the guys had ever done that themselves. I worked on the managing money challenge. When she married, her husband recognized that she was good at it while he was struggling. She manages the money, and he deals with things that she’s not so good at–painting, small repairs around the house, etc. We all have our own abilities and shouldn’t hesitate to take them on. A reasonable partner will concur. The problem is that there are WAY too many unreasonable people around, both male and female.

  17. MamaLiberty
    MamaLiberty July 1, 2015 7:15 am

    Never had much interest in being “superior,” and now I’m almost out of estrogen altogether… The whole thing is just so ridiculous to an individualist. 🙂

  18. Kyle
    Kyle July 1, 2015 8:35 am

    Claire,

    Speaking of statist feminism (that “academia,” you mentioned), do you think feminists, much like Muslims, Negroes, and homosexuals, are being used as government pawns in order to make us all “equally enslaved?”

  19. Shel
    Shel July 1, 2015 9:02 am

    When the “battle of the sexes” goes beyond joking, it’s no longer mutual amusement but extremely destructive. As many of the commentariat have noted, there’s no excuse for any of it.

    Jung observed that society suffers from a lack of rituals. Jews, for example, are blessed with the Bar Mitzvah (and Bat Mitzvah) in which it is impressed upon the honoree that thereafter they will be expected to behave like an adult with all the responsibilities. If they don’t they will endure adult consequences. In the absence of such a reminder, men behave irresponsibly (they never grow up anyway, and those who believe they have are a problem to the universe) and women react just as irresponsibly. Phyllis Schlafly has been very articulate on the scourge of feminism.

    In religious terms, the “love, honor, and obey” bit is balanced by a man’s obligation to love the woman as he loves his God, i.e., be willing to die for her. That’s about as strong as a obligation can get.

    Interestingly, Glubb on p.15 http://people.uncw.edu/kozloffm/glubb.pdf noted that one characteristic of the Age of Decadence of an empire was prominence of women in professions. If appears to be a fact; I can only guess that if a society has roles defined for people, then everything tends to get done, especially the raising of children, without which there is no future society. Harsh as it can be on an individual level it appears to have societal benefits. And having welfare reduce males to the role of sperm donors hardly helps.

    And yes, Pat, women’s anger is worse. I cannot possibly explain it as well as Kipling, who understood it – along with so many other things – perfectly. http://www.poetryloverspage.com/poets/kipling/female_of_species.html

  20. Steve Ramsey
    Steve Ramsey July 1, 2015 12:19 pm

    Don’t worry about us men, we’ll get by one way or another. But as Fred Reed often points out, we need to worry about the boys, and what is being done to them.

    Medicated, pacified, feminized, and indoctrinated into a cult of ritual guilt for being competitive, aggressive and masculine, our boys are in a world of trouble.

  21. Claire
    Claire July 1, 2015 12:48 pm

    Absolutely, Steve. Worry about what’s being done to boys — and what that means for all of society for generations to come.

  22. KiA
    KiA July 1, 2015 1:37 pm

    i’m flattered that my humor has inspired a blog topic. maybe it’ll even cure writer’s block! i’m glad that it made you laugh — i would have also settled for a chuckle.

    it wasn’t so much about the “one, right, male way to get the Xterra fixed”. it was that out of all the rite ways, you chose the one wrong way. [pause for chuckle] i kid. in all seriousness it was not about rite/wrong, superior/inferior method of doing things. it was about what makes sense to me and what doesn’t. please note that while what you did does not make sense to me, i did not insist on what you should do. in fact, it would not make sense to go to “living freedom” blog to tell people what to do (unless they ask for advice).

    also, where you define male/female by hormonal differences, i was referring to those ruled by the spell of Femaleteus, the goddess of Nuts.

    what did not make sense?
    1) i assumed that as an independent person living out in the boons, and a writer for backwoods home, that you would have interest in learning about the car and maybe even doing the repair yourself. this was somewhat validated when you mentioned that you have the service manual for said car. the capability was not doubted. at the end i felt that you’re not interested in the voodoo magic under the hood. you just want the damned thing fixed.

    2) that you took it from mechanic to mechanic. each time they start from scratch; some doing unrelated tune-ups. all the while deducting from the wallet and increasing the frustration level.

    3) that while seeking facts about the cause of the issue, you omitted factual details about the work done by the mechanics, and instead wrote about the emotional and idealistic perspectives.

    4) that if $1000 for an ECU is a concern, that you would consider paying that for a whole different can of worms (older used car, aka the prizm).

    5) that if money is a concern, why pay the high labor rate of different mechanics instead of pooling that money towards repairing the culprit ECU.

    now, i understand that:
    a) i don’t know all the details
    b) i’m making many assumptions
    c) you ain’t got splainin to do
    d) this was not a technical documentary on fixing the xtera — although it did get fairly intense with details for a bit
    e) the blog+comments format is not best suited for an ongoing discussion, as a forum would be — although i do give you credit for getting involved with the commentariats

    and, personally prefer that comments are short humorous little blurbs; if not informative.

    relating to the topic, it’s ok to mention (proudly rather) the race/gender in case of an accomplishment. however in case of failure, nobody best say nothin’ regarding race or gender.

    anywho, on with the show..

  23. Claire
    Claire July 1, 2015 2:13 pm

    “1) i assumed that as an independent person living out in the boons, and a writer for backwoods home, that you would have interest in learning about the car and maybe even doing the repair yourself.”

    Tried to learn auto mechanics several times in my 20s and 30s. Didn’t work out. Now I’ve got a mystery problem that mechanics can’t fix + a broken ankle. Great way to start learning DIY repairs! (Fact is, though, that I’ve got two more fixes to try and I’m going to do them both myself.)

    “2) that you took it from mechanic to mechanic. each time they start from scratch;”

    They didn’t start from scratch. Each knew what the others had done. Some of the work that appears random to you (e.g. fuel filter) needed to be done, anyhow.

    “3) that while seeking facts about the cause of the issue, you omitted factual details about the work done by the mechanics, and instead wrote about the emotional and idealistic perspectives.”

    You spotted the emotions but somehow didn’t notice the several long threads earlier discussing symptoms?

    “4) that if $1000 for an ECU is a concern, that you would consider paying that for a whole different can of worms (older used car, aka the prizm).”

    $1,000 for an ECU is a no-go because, as I have said multiple times, the mechanic who suggested that was obviously purely guessing. He had NO idea what he was talking about. As it happens, though, a rebuilt ECU is one of the fixes I may try on my own, at considerably lower cost.

    OTOH, while $1,000 for an older car absolutely does have “can of worms” written all over it, it lets me be mobile again while I continue to try to figure out what’s wrong with the Xterra. Without some form of motor transport, I’m back to being stuck in my house, asking favors of neighbors for even the smallest of errands since my walking-to-town experiments were premature.

    $1,000 for an ECU = money down a rat hole. Nothing to show for it. $1,000 for a car = emergency transport + something I can sell later.

    “a) i don’t know all the details
    b) i’m making many assumptions
    c) you ain’t got splainin to do
    d) this was not a technical documentary on fixing the xtera — although it did get fairly intense with details for a bit”

    Yep to all of the above (though I do prefer to ‘splain). Thanks for your explanation — and the inspiration for a blog post.

  24. Jim Bovard
    Jim Bovard July 1, 2015 4:19 pm

    That’s a great vignette on your family life & formative influence, Claire. Your father’s unjust heavy-handed ways helped create one helluva freedom fighter.

  25. Paul Bonneau
    Paul Bonneau July 1, 2015 6:22 pm

    [OTOH, I’ve always thought that tax breaks for churches violated the establishment clause]

    Perhaps, but I never sneer at anyone’s attempts to avoid theft. More power to the churches I say; at least they are not helping the government to bomb children. The correct reaction, I think, is “if churches don’t have to pay taxes, why should individuals?”

    [Does estrogen allow for more nanny government and less independence?]

    It’s an implementation detail. Imagine women having been given the vote, they also at the same time were given their own House of Representatives, so that bills had to run the gantlet of three houses rather than two. Result: less war, but gun control and socialism goes nowhere. Or not as far, anyway…

    BTW Claire, your Dad was not so far off (at least in intentions) about car fixing. When I was young I thought it through. I realized that I could fix my motorcycle or have someone else do it. I might be more likely to break something, but on average I should be able to maintain and repair my bike for less money than it takes to hire it out, and I got to learn in the process. I’ve almost always been a D-I-Y kinda guy as a result. Sometimes the real experts put me to shame (e.g. cabinet work) but I can usually throw something functional together. It’s even easier now with the internet. People just love to help each other work on their stuff.

    However KiA, in defense of Claire, I doubt a new ECU will do anything.

    [Speaking of statist feminism (that “academia,” you mentioned), do you think feminists, much like Muslims, Negroes, and homosexuals, are being used as government pawns in order to make us all “equally enslaved?”]

    Here is a quote that is germane:
    “I felt that the Reconstruction policy, so far as it related to my race, was in a large measure on a false foundation, was artificial and forced. In many cases it seemed to me that the ignorance of my race was being used as a tool with which to help white men into office, and that there was an element in the North which wanted to punish the Southern white men by forcing the Negro into positions over the heads of Southern whites. I felt that the Negro would be the one to suffer for this in the end.”
    — Booker T. Washington

  26. A.G.
    A.G. July 1, 2015 8:42 pm

    What Bovard said. You’ve done an impressive job of Nietzschean transformative overcoming.
    The world must have been a very confusing and frustrating place for your Earthly father, and I’m surprised that someone with his apparent lack of cognitive ability sired someone such as yourself.
    I’d love to have a daughter like you.

  27. Claire
    Claire July 2, 2015 7:36 am

    A.G. — You and Jim Bovard are nice. But I’m quite sure I was at least as much of a pain in the you-know-what as my father was.

    Yes, I do sometimes feel sorry for Dad, who never managed to comprehend reality and blamed everyone else for every lack and every failure. And I did grow from the experience of being around him. Some. But not enough.

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