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Tuesday links

  • Wow. You know that woman who drove into the parade crowd in Oklahoma? Apparently at least some of the media seems more than usually pre-programmed to blame the non-existent gun. David Codrea points out that the car-killer babe is apparently an Obama fan, too.
  • I don’t know about you, but this sort of vague, ill-reported United Nations “science” makes me want to go right out and eat bacon. Maple flavored. Crisp. Oh, I have no doubt processed meats don’t qualify as health food, but I also doubt that the big bacon and sausage eaters dying of cancer are otherwise noshing on broccoli and brussels sprouts all day, either. You just cannot isolate individual foods and make such claims about them — unless it suits your agenda.
  • Well, good luck with that, REI. Forgive me if I suspect it’s not going to help your bottom line.
  • Social justice warriors and … um, Star Trek? Or something. I think I’m losing the thread here. But Nicki, as always, in entertainingly indignant.
  • How friendships change with adulthood.

30 Comments

  1. Pat
    Pat October 27, 2015 5:56 am

    Re: friendships: The author(s) mentioned every “external” factor that might affect a friendship, but neglected one important “internal” factor: people (hopefully) grow and mature.

    This involves not just circumstances and knowledge, but understanding; not just understanding, but wisdom. Some people never grow forward, can never leave their old self behind, and/or never seem to know how to evaluate or alter their position in light of new knowledge. This can radically affect friendships.

    Also, both character and personality can be altered by circumstances, which may affect friendships beyond the factors mentioned in the article.

  2. Brent
    Brent October 27, 2015 6:06 am

    Wanted to get this our there as I find the admission very telling.
    .What does it say about police if they are afraid of being video taped while doing their job.

    ” Lt. Gary Vickers of the Newark, New Jersey Police Department, indicated that he fears “death by media” if a video of his performance on the job were to go viral.”

    http://truthinmedia.com/police-youtube-effect/

    Just saw this being discussed on CNN and the talking head used exactly what the FBI guy said to make her touchy feely point. “I talked to many police officers and they say they *feel under seige* when being video recorded by the public for *just doing their job*”
    *blink*
    So let me get this straight. Help me to understand WHY would a peace officer feel threatened by people watching him do his *officer friendly* routine?

  3. Sagebrush Dog Walker
    Sagebrush Dog Walker October 27, 2015 6:32 am

    We celebrated this “study” last night with a buffalo wing chicken salad sprinkled with delicious hickory smoked bacon. They can have my salami when they pry it from my cold dead hand. 😉

  4. Ellendra
    Ellendra October 27, 2015 7:05 am

    Anybody got a good recipe for a maple brown sugar bacon cure? I tried curing my own last winter, but it came out WAAAAYYYYYY too salty!

    It’s almost cold enough to set up my smoker again 🙂

  5. Dana
    Dana October 27, 2015 7:54 am

    Time to remember The Great Pig Raffle. 😉

    How about adding some bacon to Decadent Potato Casserole? It would make the recipe a bit more explicitly non-Kosher (literally) thus expanding (if only slightly) the offended audience.

  6. MamaLiberty
    MamaLiberty October 27, 2015 8:06 am

    Tried to post this in comments at Liberty Zone, but it didn’t take…

    I’m a writer… though I write mostly for my own amusement. Don’t follow the news of the “trade” much, and seldom read anything published after 1950 or so – since most things written after that seem to be full of intentional victimhood, gun control and other nonsense instead of realistic stories about people and events.

    Anyway, a while back I decided to see what a story would look like if ALL stereotypes, real and imagined, were left out of it. No mention of race, skin color, sex or cultural preference. Insipid is the kindest word I can find for it. The old “Dick and Jane” stories from first grade are much more readable and interesting.

    All of these descriptive terms are just that, descriptive. That they’ve all been turned into judgments on the rightness, morals and intelligence of the characters – not to mention the real people around us – is not only insane, but destructive to both literature and society.

    I certainly don’t agree with everything Heinlein wrote, or Bradbury, Clark or any others… but I enjoy the complexity and adventure of their stories anyway. Can’t recall ever once thinking the poor wimmins in them were being particularly abused. Most of them had guns or other weapons close to hand, actually.

  7. Claire
    Claire October 27, 2015 8:12 am

    Oh, such a good memory you have, Dana. And such a bad attitude. 😉

    I’d forgotten I ever wrote up the Great Pig Raffle. But at the time, I couldn’t resist. It truly was (as it says there at the end) based on real events. Events that really did happen in the young animal-rescue group I worked with. PETA actually made us the focus of a nationwide hate campaign. In our case, though, PETA people showed up in person (which they didn’t in Hardyville). They turned up inside a private business, after hours, without consent, to try to stop the pig raffle.

    It was pretty funny, though scary at that moment for the business owner. The extra attention sold a lot of raffle tickets.

  8. idahobob
    idahobob October 27, 2015 8:48 am

    The agenda for the UN on telling the lie that bacon is no good for you………..the Muslim invasion, and subsequent conquest of Europe.

    We be next..

    Bob
    III

  9. Shel
    Shel October 27, 2015 9:08 am

    I like bacon, too. Is it possible that cholesterol isn’t so bad after all? For some reason 🙂 I couldn’t find the article separately listed on the ‘net. http://onlinestore.usatoday.com/10222015-issue-of-usa-today-p18072.aspx According to the article, the study was done using rats by the “International Center for Alternative Scientific Theory (ICAST).” Couldn’t find them on the ‘net either.

  10. Shel
    Shel October 27, 2015 9:19 am

    I like bacon, too. Is it possible that cholesterol could be helpful? For some reason 🙂 I couldn’t find the article listed separately on the ‘net. http://onlinestore.usatoday.com/10222015-issue-of-usa-today-p18072.aspx According to the print version in front of me, the study was done by the “International Center for Alternative Scientific Theory (ICAST)” using rats. Can’t find them on the ‘net either.

  11. Claire
    Claire October 27, 2015 9:36 am

    Come to think if it, this might be a good time to make beef (or game) jerky, too.

    https://www.himtnjerky.com/

    NFI on my part, but the owners are terrific people. 🙂

  12. Claire
    Claire October 27, 2015 9:41 am

    “It’s either a pork conspiracy or growing Muslim influence”

    Aaron Zelman used to rail against the UN, not only for all the usual reasons, but because it’s become so Muslim-Arab dominated.

    Of course, observant Jews are against pork, too. But I’ve never known one of them who objected to what non-Jews ate. OTOH, it’s sadly true that a growing percentage of Muslims seem determine to have the whole world run on the laws of their particular superstition — or else.

  13. revjen45
    revjen45 October 27, 2015 9:57 am

    I figure all the broccoli I eat will counteract the bacon.

  14. Ellendra
    Ellendra October 27, 2015 11:12 am

    “Is it possible that cholesterol could be helpful?”

    As long as you spend time out in the sun, yes. Cholesterol is what the body uses to make vitamin D, with the help of sunlight:
    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/what-is-vitamin-d-and-how-does-it-work.html

    There are some who hypothesize that high cholesterol is actually the body’s reaction to vit D deficiency, making it a symptom and not a disorder.

  15. Ellendra
    Ellendra October 27, 2015 11:13 am

    Pat, thanks for the recipe! I’ll give that one a try.

  16. Bob
    Bob October 27, 2015 12:00 pm

    Brent, I think there is a level of scrutiny which is possible when everyone and his brother has a video camera at his finger tips, which can be daunting to the most innocent(read perfect) cop trying to do his job. While one has to act in real time, another can analyze the act ‘frame by frame.’ I understand why those cops who treat people badly would object to being the subject of a youtube video. But I also understand why an honest cop whose motives and intentions are as pure as snow would also fear the youtube treatment. It’s similar to, “If you have nothing to hide, why do you object?”
    When I was working, I was not a cop, but it sure would have dampened my efforts to do the best job I could if I were being filmed all the time.

  17. Kevin Wilmeth
    Kevin Wilmeth October 27, 2015 12:42 pm

    For the amusement of the Commentariat, herewith a story I found heartwarming. It seems a lady, beset with prospective burglars, defended herself most effectively with an excellent attitude (no shots necessary) and her precision airgun.

    What’s amusing is that none of the “authorized media” seems to have even noticed it’s not a firearm, and–to her total credit–she’s not offering it either. Don’t know her full story, of course, but from what I’ve seen so far, I like her!

  18. Timmy
    Timmy October 27, 2015 12:55 pm

    Have you ever been in a REI store? It’s worse than Whole Paycheck (Foods). I doubt it’s the sort of place anyone goes on black friday.

  19. LarryA
    LarryA October 27, 2015 3:06 pm

    Apparently at least some of the media seems more than usually pre-programmed to blame the non-existent gun.

    It’s only a step away from continuing coverage of the Santa Barbara “shooting.”
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/santa-barbara-shooting/
    Six killed, 14 wounded!

    Except half those killed the “shooter” stabbed to death, and half the “wounded” he hit with his car.

  20. Shel
    Shel October 27, 2015 7:42 pm

    Thanks, ML. Brownstein’s posting is totally consistent with the article I read. They took rats, giving one group a healthy diet. The other got eggs and bacon cooked in lard and smothered in Hollandaise sauce. Both groups were forced to breathe polluted air, the equivalent of smoking three packs per day, for 7 months. The control group all had cancer; the experimental group didn’t (as the article described it).

    For a while, I was wondering if the organization’s reporting was no more credible than the Journal of Irreproducible Results. http://everything2.com/title/The+Journal+of+Irreproducible+Results My favorite article, published in the mid ’70’s, was “The Dead Twin Study,” which compared one surviving and one dead twin. Wish I could find it again 🙁

  21. Paul Bonneau
    Paul Bonneau October 28, 2015 8:03 am

    “Have you ever been in a REI store? It’s worse than Whole Paycheck (Foods).”

    This is a little harsh. It may serve the yuppie hiking and camping clientel, but it’s still an interesting store to visit. I’ve got some REI equipment myself; it’s good stuff.

  22. Ron Johnson
    Ron Johnson October 29, 2015 4:48 am

    Long-time retailer here. Some of those great sales events, like Black Friday, can be bottom-line losers. They are good for driving a retailer’s volume, maintaining cash flow, and keeping the consumer buying in their stores instead of at the competition. However, it is debatable whether or not the stores would be better off by foregoing the sales if they can also forego the added expenses (extra payroll, security, inventory, freight) that can outstrip the margin $’s the sales bring in. It’s the law of diminishing returns.

    I worked for a department store chain that steeply scaled back their advertising and promotional calendar by cutting out 1/3 of their promotions. The cutbacks hurt sales dollars for a year, but the bottom line profitability improved.

    I don’t know if this was part of REI’s calculation or not. Businesses sometimes make the same kind of feel-good mushy-headed decisions that we associate with government, with the main difference being that if they guess wrong they can’t tax their customers to cover their goof. For the sake of the executives who made this decision, I hope they’re right. I’m sure there are people within REI that will be looking for heads on a pike if it hurts the bottom line.

  23. bud
    bud October 30, 2015 3:29 pm

    I’ve been a member of REI for… ummm…. 40? 41? years… back when the only store they had was Seattle. I’ve had checkout clerks say that they hadn’t seen a number that low in years.

    Any organization goes to hell (defined as being run by a bureaucracy -see Pournelle’s Iron Law) when they reach a sufficient size. I belong to 3 credit unions; two are essentially mega-banks with hundreds of branches extending across state lines, and the third is one where, when I walk into the only office, they ask how my dog is doing. I do most of my day-to-day financial operations with the smaller, but when I need a loan, 3 times out of 4, the big ones have a better deal. Economies of scale, etc.

    Same thing with REI; the economies of scale create deals that you can’t get at the local outfit… not all the time, but often enough to make shopping there worthwhile. They’ve figured out the way to make money in retail clothing – women’s sportswear: the highest margin, biggest selling segment. To cater to the demographic that fuels that segment, they carry lots of well-made, but overpriced goods, but… Along with what pays the high salaries of their own bureaucracy, they do manage to carry enough “real” outdoor gear at good prices that I put up with the fact that 80-% of the store is stuff that is indistinguishable from Macy’s Juniors department .

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