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Author: Claire

Making it Through the Next “Normal”

The other day, a friend talking about her wildly dysfunctional childhood remarked, “But that was just ‘normal’ for me, of course.” And haven’t we all been there in one way or another? Whatever we habitually experience (however chaotic or misery-inducing) is “normal.” And that’s not just true of children who haven’t the perspective to know better. Spend long enough in a terrible job, a loveless marriage, a prison, a city you hate, or an unfree political climate and even when we recognize how bad it is, we forget what it’s like to live any other way. Finding real normal again…

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Saturday links

I’m working on that promised blogosaurus. I really am. It’s about halfway done, but it keeps wanting to pull in a different direction than I want it to go. With luck, I’ll wrestle it into submission by early next week. In the meantime, here are some links to keep you entertained, charmed, baffled, ticked off, informed, or whatever the case may be. —– In the Land of Opportunity, the wealth of the richest 1% is about to outstrip the worth of the country’s entire middle class. Cheers. Florida gets its first Second Amendment sanctuary county. Today is the anniversary of…

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I have returned

Greetings, readers and friends. I’m back from four glorious days at the shore, where Mother Nature favored the land with near-summerlike weather and I enjoyed walking, snacking, and feeding seagulls on the beach. More perfect weather and a more perfect time you could not imagine. It could only have been improved had I had a doting lover peeling grapes for me as we lounged on the sand. But one can’t have everything, I suppose. —– Anyhow, I didn’t think of computers or political matters for days. It was sublime, but now reality beckons. Home, my next job is setting up…

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Computers have arrived! (And other, smaller events of the day.)

We may be an awesome species, but there are moments that make one want to quit the human race. This morning I was YouTubing instructions on how to dance the waltz (don’t ask). At the end of a video that showed no more than the basic 1-2-3-1-2-3 box step, there came a warning: Do not try this without supervision, specialized equipment, and further training. Fortunately there was no caution about the waltz being known to cause cancer in the state of California. But really, people. Really??? —– Back on the good, even grand, side of human nature … The White…

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The importance of awe

On Thursday, a warm, sunny day, I drove to the gas station to vacuum dog hair out of the KIA. I was surprised to find that the station — the biggest, newest, and most modern in the area — was shuttered and its tanks being torn out of the ground. The vacuum, across the lot, was still functional. So I worked away as I watched the workmen working away. There are a lot of things you could think about seeing a nearly new gas station so upended: What a waste! Were the tanks leaking? Is there damage to our water…

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What they’re doing to Assange …

… is at least as bad as (possibly much worse than) rumors have said. And although this is being done by Britain, we all know who it is being done for. I was deeply shaken while witnessing yesterday’s events in Westminster Magistrates Court. Every decision was railroaded through over the scarcely heard arguments and objections of Assange’s legal team, by a magistrate who barely pretended to be listening. Before I get on to the blatant lack of fair process, the first thing I must note was Julian’s condition. I was badly shocked by just how much weight my friend has…

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Tuesday ramble: Computers, apples, computers, tomatoes

Last Saturday I thought I might gather some links for you. I’d been using the library’s computers all week, but mostly visiting “friendly” sites. I hadn’t done any general surfing. And OMG, when I ventured into the nooz world, I had to flee after a few minutes. The library keeps its computers muted by default, but apparently they have no defenses anywhere. Pop-ups pop, and pop again, sometimes four or five times on a site. Banners wave and zoom and flip and flash, and change color and generally demand more attention than a petulant two-year-old. Videos play by themselves as…

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COMPUTER CRASH POST-MORTEM
or
Don’t do what I did

On Tuesday I arrived at the library to send already-composed emails and make a blog post. The laptop wouldn’t boot. Bear Bussjaeger quickly and correctly diagnosed a hard drive problem; the drive was going south, boot sector first. But the real problem wasn’t a dramatic crash of the hard drive. It was more like a slow leak between my ears. This post is to recount where I went wrong, note the very few things I did right, thank the people who saved my backside, and serve as a cautionary tale for anybody out there who might be stumbling into similar…

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Death of the computer

I went to the library this morning to send some emails and do a blog post. The gods had other ideas; my reliable old laptop wouldn’t boot. It went into an endless loop of error messages and unfollowable instructions. I came home and re-installed the OS, hoping that would be the solution. But nope. The looping errors quit, but so did everything else. The only good sign: I can look at the directories via a live DVD and see that data (Some? All? A smidge?) is intact. Otherwise I’m without contact and without clue. I’m composing this on a phone,…

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Saturday links

Maggie McNeill: The concept of consent should apply to government operatives, as well as freelance molesters, snoops, and sadists. James Howard Kunstler writes an “in memoriam” for reality. Following PayPal’s departure, Mastercard, eBay, and Stripe all depart F*c*b**k’s troubled Libra cryptocurrency project. “Guns and Cannabis: The Insidious Creep of Tyranny” by John Klar. Borepatch and his comment section nail the governmental stupidity of a system that can prevent wildfires only by depriving people of electricity. … Outages the majority of Californians are stubbornly unprepared for. And (also related), Victor Davis Hanson laments, Why have we become so small? (H/T PT)…

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