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Category: Free speech

Tuesday links

  • Private business doesn’t need more laws and regulations to deal with pollution.
  • Peter Thiel (who knows something about the CIA, being rather cozy with it), sez the CIA and FBI should investigate Google. Maybe somebody should investigate the FBI, the CIA, and pseudo-libertarian agent of the uber-state Thiel.
  • Just out yesterday: Five good habits to dramatically reduce your chances of dementia (even if you’re genetically predisposed). 5 Comments
  • Voices from the past, looking toward the future

    Happy post-Independence Day. Never mind that post-independence might be all to apt a description. —– I’ve been thinking about religion more than politics these days and contemplating my possible irrelevance. This post begins with religion, but it’s about the larger picture. And freedom; as usual, everything’s about freedom. Inspired by books like Barrie Wilson’s How Jesus Became Christian, Stephen Stoeller’s comprehensive insider’s look at gnosticism, and the works of Karen King, Bart Ehrman, Elaine Pagels, and too many others to name, my mind has been in the past — and not the past of rousing revolutions or ringing statements of…

    11 Comments

    Saturday links

    Once again, links keep finding me (though more slowly than they did when I was online all the time, so some of these are a few days old) … Mohamed Noor, the cop who murdered Justine Damond, has been sentenced to 12.5 years in prison. (H/T F) Scot Peterson, the school resource officer who cowered in safety while students died, has been arrested and criminally charged. Eric Peters writes of human veal calves and the end of America’s teen romance with cars (and the freedom they represent). Not quite as absurd as the Vatican waiting 500 years to apologize to…

    5 Comments

    Seeking, Finding, Church, State, Freedom: Part I

    The gnostic understands Christ’s message not as offering a set of answers, but as encouragement to engage in the process of searching … — Elaine Pagels, The Gnostic Gospels Trust those who seek the truth but doubt those who say they have found it. — Andre Gide (and many others) You cannot reason with a tiger when your hand is in its mouth. — Winston Churchill, In Darkest Hour —– Political freedom is (almost!) an oxymoron. All freedom is personal. A thoughtfully constituted government like the one these formerly united States started with can for a time slow down the…

    14 Comments

    Tuesday links

    A few links for a change. Some are new, a few I’ve been saving for you … So-called Modern Monetary Theory will be a Modern Monetary Disaster, as anybody beyond the pink unicorn stage of development can see. Speaking of which, the NYT reports that Venezuela’s inflation is now worse than Zimbabwe’s. They still can’t bring themselves to use the “S” word, though they admit that the “economic policies” of Chavez and Maduro may have something to do with the problem. John Wick Part III, aka Parabellum was released last Friday. Seems everybody, including Rolling Stone has high praise. Seen…

    8 Comments

    You can’t stop the signal (and other brief end-of-week items)

    The Wandering Monk completed his part of current projects early this afternoon, leaving a houseful of dust, construction rubble, and scattered tools. Also leaving me (happily) with lots more work to do. I’m looking forward to doing having done all that lovely finishing. I’m sore and beat now and still have had no time for Deep Reflections (though the Monk and I did have fun demolishing AOC and the latest authoritarian fantasy from her ally Beto O’Rourke). So for now, I leave you with other people’s thoughts, some of them more worthwhile than mine might be at the moment. —–…

    4 Comments

    Some freedom sayings that might better be left unsaid

    “The world lives by phrases,” said Herbert Hoover. He spoke in the era when men like Edward Bernays, advertising mogul J. Walter Thompson, and government propaganda czar George Creel were making manipulation of the public mind “scientific.” Not to mention all pervasive. Slogans and other simple phrases were handy for taking over people’s brains. One hundred years on, and with Twitter as our bible, we may be the most phrase-driven people ever. But no doubt the pithy quote, ringing slogan, or pseudo-wise saying has always driven humans — and often driven them to heaven knows what. “Hierosolyma est perdita” (“Jerusalem…

    16 Comments

    Tales of the Old Aristocracy and the new

    Note: After drafting this at home all day, I’m posting it in the cold outside a closed library. I usually do a lot of revisions when blogging something I’ve written offline. So if it has more than the usual amount of typos, poor editing, or rambling passages, please forgive it. It’s been snowing and I’m not staying out here in the car much longer to give it the usual polishing. Reflections on two recent books and a tragic ancient history whose spirit is rising again I’m reading two books right now that have absolutely nothing to do with each other.…

    7 Comments

    Where will you be for Civil War II?

    Yes, I know. According to the strictest definition (factions battling violently to control the same government) the U.S. hasn’t had Civil War I — yet. But leave that quibble aside for the moment; there are other definitions. Suddenly, talk of upcoming Civil War II is everywhere. Oh sure, predictions of war have been made on the political fringes for decades. But now they’re mainstream — or as close to mainstream as you can get without having the (increasingly empty-headed) New York Times do a cosmopolitan feature on what fashionable Manhattanites should wear apres battle. I’ve never been convinced we’re headed…

    25 Comments

    Friday links

  • Five things to do to counter the culture wars against boys and men.
  • Nine-year-old girl wants to do mother’s helper work in her neighborhood. Multiple neighbors call the cops, making no effort to check whether the kid is really being marketed as a slave laborer. Jerks. (H/T MtK)
  • Border Patrol agent thought he was improving the world by killing prostitutes. (Never seems to occur to “do-gooders” that they might be the problem.) 7 Comments