Press "Enter" to skip to content

Category: Mind and Spirit

Spirituality, moods, feelings, and thinking free to live free.

Saturday links + joke

Boris Johnson’s monumental victory in Britain should remind U.S. Democrats of an important thing or two. Britain’s Labour Party “got woke and went broke” deserted en masse by working-class v*ters. Time magazine’s petulant brat of the year says up against the wall with leaders who don’t execute her climate agenda. Seeing like a finite state machine. Second amendment: Virginians stand their ground on sanctuary counties while the nation watches. Frightened, arrogant anti-gun pols threaten “consequences” — up to and including sending the National Guard in as an occupying force. The greatest political miracle? Trump has revamped the 9th circuit court.…

15 Comments

Getting to high ground ahead of the flood

A few days ago a freedomista friend cried, “That’s it! I quit.” He’s going to live strictly for himself and his family from now on. So he says. Forget politics, forget organizing, forget publishing, forget “movements” and “isms” and activism, and hopeful enthusiasms. He. Has. HAD IT. Well, that’s common enough. I may have said things like that myself a time or two; perhaps you have, too. But this isn’t just a case of burnout. Burnout is part of it, yes. But there’s something more, and more ominous, to it, as we’ll see below. My friend is afraid. Then this…

17 Comments

A Role for Elders

This is a guest post by my friend Silver. All credit for it goes to him. — C —– In Making it Through the Next Normal Claire questioned possible roles for us old folks. One of the things we oldsters can do to help the young folks through their coming trials is to teach them that they don’t have to be high profile, high paid, high stress, famous people to have good, satisfying jobs and wonderful lives. Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs fame nailed this. He found that people who did those often invisible, generally dirty jobs tended to be…

9 Comments

Making it Through the Next “Normal”

The other day, a friend talking about her wildly dysfunctional childhood remarked, “But that was just ‘normal’ for me, of course.” And haven’t we all been there in one way or another? Whatever we habitually experience (however chaotic or misery-inducing) is “normal.” And that’s not just true of children who haven’t the perspective to know better. Spend long enough in a terrible job, a loveless marriage, a prison, a city you hate, or an unfree political climate and even when we recognize how bad it is, we forget what it’s like to live any other way. Finding real normal again…

7 Comments

Saturday links

I’m working on that promised blogosaurus. I really am. It’s about halfway done, but it keeps wanting to pull in a different direction than I want it to go. With luck, I’ll wrestle it into submission by early next week. In the meantime, here are some links to keep you entertained, charmed, baffled, ticked off, informed, or whatever the case may be. —– In the Land of Opportunity, the wealth of the richest 1% is about to outstrip the worth of the country’s entire middle class. Cheers. Florida gets its first Second Amendment sanctuary county. Today is the anniversary of…

4 Comments

I have returned

Greetings, readers and friends. I’m back from four glorious days at the shore, where Mother Nature favored the land with near-summerlike weather and I enjoyed walking, snacking, and feeding seagulls on the beach. More perfect weather and a more perfect time you could not imagine. It could only have been improved had I had a doting lover peeling grapes for me as we lounged on the sand. But one can’t have everything, I suppose. —– Anyhow, I didn’t think of computers or political matters for days. It was sublime, but now reality beckons. Home, my next job is setting up…

5 Comments

Saturday links

Maggie McNeill: The concept of consent should apply to government operatives, as well as freelance molesters, snoops, and sadists. James Howard Kunstler writes an “in memoriam” for reality. Following PayPal’s departure, Mastercard, eBay, and Stripe all depart F*c*b**k’s troubled Libra cryptocurrency project. “Guns and Cannabis: The Insidious Creep of Tyranny” by John Klar. Borepatch and his comment section nail the governmental stupidity of a system that can prevent wildfires only by depriving people of electricity. … Outages the majority of Californians are stubbornly unprepared for. And (also related), Victor Davis Hanson laments, Why have we become so small? (H/T PT)…

5 Comments

Doubt: A guest post

The following was written by the son of a Living Freedom blog reader. Homeschooled, and mostly unschooled, he wrote this as part of his college application. —– The meanest dog you’ll ever meet, He ain’t the hound dog in the street. He bares some teeth and tears some skin, But brother, that’s the worst of him. No, the dog you really gotta dread, Is the one that howls inside your head, It’s him whose howling drives men mad, And a mind to its undoing. The ancient tale of Orpheus and Eurydice is a familiar one. A young man falls in…

2 Comments

A Tuesday ramble including more somewhat random thoughts on Outsiders

Since December of 1989, I’ve walked my dogs (anywhere from one to six of them) a mile or so every morning and every afternoon. Every day unless I’ve been too sick or the weather has been downright dangerous. Yesterday we had our first frost. I bundled up, but the breeze was just stiff enough to pierce my clothes, redden my cheeks, and set my nose dripping. Ava seemed to enjoy herself, but all I could think was, “I can’t face another long winter of bone-chilling morning walks.” Ava, even at 14, has boundless walkie energy and will stare at me…

11 Comments

The Outsiders’ Gift

“Every culture should have a couple of outsiders bringing a message from outside of the dominant culture. I’d like to think there’s something I too can add to the way we view the world.” — Philip Connors, fire lookout and author —– Last week you guys in the blog Commentariat and I wrote about the value (or lack of value) of “tribal elders” — wise men and women who stand as guardians of principles, traditions, and hard-won wisdom. In a sense, those elders are the ultimate insiders of a society. They teach, they preserve, they protect. But they also usually…

15 Comments