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Category: Monkeywrenching

Pronouns: The monkeywrench

One of the sorrows of living in the “everything is terrorism” era is the dearth, almost the death, of monkeywrenching opportunities. The harmless prank of the 1990s has become the terroristic threat of the 21st century. Still, monkeywrenching can never die, and one perfect (and perfectly charming) opportunity exists, particularly for you who are forced to live among the politically correct and the worst sorts of social-justice pecksniffery. That opportunity lies in the previously humble, unassuming pronoun. You know: he, she, his, hers, its, they, theirs. —– Now, before I get pitchforked to death by the urban mob, I must…

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Our first review

Thank you, Mama Liberty. You really nailed the purpose of the book. UPDATE: First reviewS, actually. We also just got our first Amazon write-up — and it’s five stars! Thank you, Dave. The viewpoint of his review is quite different than ML’s, but he also not only writes a great review, but understands the book with wonderful clarity, just as she did. Thank you both.

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Paperback sales start TOMORROW!

The bad news: Amazon kicked back the paperback file on a technicality. The good news: The technicality was small, but the rejection gave Kit and me a chance to rethink the release of the printed book. So. Tomorrow — Wednesday, April 4 — you can place your order for the paperback of Basics of Resistance. Not your pre-order. Your order. UPDATE: See below. We’ve been absolutely thrilled by your response. We know a lot of you are awaiting the paperback. Because it’s print-on-demand it’ll probably take longer than a standard Amazon order (how much longer we don’t yet know) and…

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Sunday/Monday links

  • Nero Cuomo fiddles while Rome New York burns
  • Creative outlawry (whether you like it or not): Seattle skateboarders construct an illicit skateboard bowl on a lake island. They win a national prize. Unfortunately the bowl will be torn out and the prize was rescinded.
  • I don’t agree with the premise, but this article is still a fascinating look back: How the 1967 Summer of Love sparked today’s religious movements. 6 Comments
  • Johatsu — “evaporated people”

    Killing time while waiting for The Wandering Monk to arrive and begin the foundation project, I found something absolutely fascinating. Johatsu. A Japanese word meaning “evaporated people.” Not dead. Not suspiciously missing. But people who’ve chosen to disappear out of their existing identities into new, perhaps off-grid ones. A French couple have been tracking this phenomenon for years and now have published a book: The Vanished: The “evaporated people” of Japan in Stories and Photographs. PRI has done a story on the johatsu and the French pair who became obsessed with them, as has Business Insider. Oddly, it turns out…

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    Friday links

  • Utah adopts the nation’s lowest blood-alcohol limit for DUIs. This affects gun owners, too. And may soon infect many more states, as the NTSB recommends the (absurd) limit. Do I smell a government looking for more opportunities to make money by creating new offenders?
  • How the fedgov made health care more expensive and made heroin cheaper.
  • Flash story: “The High Cost of Contact.” Favors delivered by force do tend to be expensive. (H/T MJR) 8 Comments
  • Ammon Hennacy’s One Man Revolution

    David Gross writes: Your readers might be interested in knowing that Ammon Hennacy’s autobiography has just been released as a free (as in speech and as in beer) ebook. Hennacy was a Christian anarchist, and the most walk-the-talk radical I can think of. He did time during World War I for distributing anti-conscription propaganda, then spent 9 months in the hole for organizing a prison strike. He quit his job and started working day labor when income tax withholding was introduced so the government wouldn’t get a dime from him. And he operated Catholic Worker houses of hospitality — homeless…

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    Wednesday links

    The FBI. — yes, the freakin’ FBI. — has cameras on Seattle streets and a judge has just forbidden releasing information about them. Why should the FBI be doing street-level surveillance in U.S. cities (if they’re in Seattle, they’re everywhere else)? We can’t know and I haven’t found a single article that tells more than this one does. (H/T @EasyMac308 on Gab) Why aren’t Americans moving away from impoverished, jobless areas? Government, of course. Oh, there are SO many problems with technocracy — as the technocrats themselves are now learning the hard way (after they made millions of us learn…

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