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Category: Practical Freedom

A broad category of things we can do, or things others are doing, to increase personal freedom

The first pebbles have shaken loose and are clattering down ahead of the landslide

By now you’ve heard. Maybe you tracked yesterday’s events live on Telegram or X. However and wherever you heard, what happened yesterday afternoon and evening was monumental. IS monumental — even if, as we cynics must always note — it contains as much performance and politicking as true defiance. Although I still, and always, hope there’s no shooting war between freedomistas and domestic tyrants, safe to say the long, unendurable, seemingly endless Awkward Stage is over. —– Yesterday … First came Texas governor Gregg Abbott, not only keeping his word — a rare enough thing for a politician — but…

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Yes. I am.

That’s the answer. The question (asked on X by a podcaster and conveyed to me by Bill St. Clair) was, “Is Claire Wolfe still alive?” Bill told the inquirer that I was not only alive but still operating and posting on The Living Freedom Forums. Then he politely suggested to me that I should inform the wider world. So here’s “proof of life,” as Bill put it, and I hope to remain among the living for a long time to come. Since I’m here to announce the (hopefully) welcome news, I’ll take the opportunity to ramble a bit. —– The…

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The consequences of avoiding reality

You can avoid reality, but you can’t avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. — Ayn Rand(ish) —– In what I hope (no doubt in vain) is peak reality-avoidance, the British Evening Standard has written an article attributing the dramatic rise in youthful heart problems to a new psychological malady, Post-Pandemic Stress Disorder. Suddenly, in 2021 — notably not in 2020, the first really traumatic year of the permademic — previously healthy young men are becoming so freaked out over COVID that they’re increasing the UK’s rate of heart problems by nearly five percent. The article doesn’t mention — not even…

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A partially “lite” and somewhat random post before descending into seriousness

Grubby work continues around Ye Olde Homestead and I cannot yet face returning to the “our job” series. I hope you enjoy this somewhat random, mostly occasionally “lite” post in the meantime. My reluctance to return to Serious Blogging is partly because the next episodes are planned to cover ideas for building alternative justice systems and nobody can build a great justice system, anywhere, at any time. Because justice systems, however noble their intent, nearly always involve both coercion and unhappy (for somebody) outcomes. But my reluctance to return is in part because events are moving so fast that the…

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Our job, part III-b: Communications brass tacks

I’m quite determined not to write a part III-c(5)(xyz) of this series, so I plan to give as good a brass-tacks overview of alt-communications potential as I can in this one post. I’m sorry to disappoint you who expect detail, but that would literally require a book. Hopefully I can provide a framework and a few good links on where future privacy tech might go. But this is an area where you of the Commentariat can fill in where I have to skim. H/Ts in advance to S, CX, the blog Commentariat, and the members of the Living Freedom Forums.…

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Our job, part III-a: Talking about communications privacy

Once again I’m breaking a long, detailed screed into a two parter. I really have to stop splitting multi-part series into multi-part mini-series. But not just yet. —– Many years ago I got a mocking write-up in one of the big national tabloids for suggesting that someday freedom lovers seeking private communications might resort to carrier pigeons. I’d made the remark only in passing (in a book chapter having to do with many alternate forms of covert communications, from modern adaptations of hobo sign to dead drops). But apparently I’d managed to come up with an idea so ridiculous that…

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Our job, part II-b: Cracks and opportunities in the medical system

Note: I would be very glad to have experienced health-care workers jump into comments with any additions, corrections (however savage), reality checks, bright ideas, personal insights, or other forms of enlightenment. —– One thing about the hardest systems to route around: Being HARD, lacking flexibility, they develop a lot of cracks. Take a look at any heavily institutionalized or subsidized medical system. I’ll use the U.S. system because the U.S. is home-not-so-sweet-home. But despite the claims that various socialized systems (e.g. Canada’s and the UK’s) are inherently better, many of the same or equally awful drawbacks apply to them. We…

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Our job, part II-a: What’s hard, what’s easy?

As I contemplated getting down to brass tacks on this topic of creating alternative systems to route around the corrupted, despotic, or just plain broken ones of oligarchy, I quailed. Such huge needs. Such a small blogger. Even with the savvy of the blog Commentariat at my back, merely writing about this, let alone doing anything about it in the real world is a colossal task. At first my thought was, “Shall I write first about the hardest systems to create or the easiest?” That is, do I plunge straight into the rock-and-hard place of how to route around the…

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Our job, part I: Groundwork

Politics is downstream from culture. — Andrew Breitbart Culture is downstream from character. — Me —– Last week I wrote that an important job ahead of us is to build parallel systems, and even parallel societies. We need these to sustain ourselves and sustain freedom as utterly corrupted, immoral, self-serving government and corporatist systems crumble. I promised a series on that. Here it begins. As with my earlier series, “In Praise of Men” (which ended up running to seven segments), it seems best to lay some groundwork. My premises for everything that follows … follow. —– 1. Alternate systems are…

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Our job, should we choose to accept it …

This will be brief. I have company this week. Though my guest and I have brainstormed through a world of perils and generated vast amounts of blog fodder, I planned to wait until next week, then begin a new multi-part series on bringing down totalitarianism. A moment has come up this afternoon, so here’s a beginning. First, please take a cruise though these links that I’ve been collecting in preparation for the upcoming series, most especially the last in the list. Adaptive Curmudgeon sums up everything that needs saying about the obnoxious, unconscionable, cruel, inciting, totalitarian, and exceedingly dangerous speech…

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