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Category: Preparedness

Winter preps (now more important than ever)

Yes, yes, I’m still working on “In Praise of Men.” Getting closer all the time. But meanwhile, life and blogging go on, however haltingly. And the topic of most immediate urgency is getting ready for what could potentially be a nasty winter. —– So Paratus, the holiday for preparedness, was in September (thank you, Commander Zero). But prepping is forever. Winter preps are vital this year. Because it’s 2020. And if that’s not explanation enough, 2021 is looming and shows no signs of being better. If the combined upcoming COVID-flu season is everything politicians and the media wish it to…

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In lieu of an actual blog post …

I’ve never worked for months on a blog post before. I’ve been working on one since early summer. I have the title. It’s “In Praise of Men.” That’s been so since the beginning. But writing such a thing is complicated, both because of the strange age we’re in, when to be male is to be eeeeeeevil, and because of my own background. Men (as even men are likely to agree) are simpler creatures than women. But there is nothing simple in relations between the sexes and there is nothing — nothing, nothing — simple about being a man in a…

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Our tribal future (a ramble)

The “left” wants somehow to unite us all behind ideas that are inherently divisive. (“My life matters more than your life,” “I belong to more victim classes than you do,” and “If you don’t think exactly what I happen to think today, you’re evil and should die.”) A growing faction on the “right” (including, apparently, former quasi-pseudo libertarian Peter Thiel), wants to unite us all behind big-government nationalism. Here’s my bet: neither plan will fly, at least not outside of academia, think tanks, and their devotees. The only thing that will ever unite millions in the foreseeable future is a…

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Little rays of sunshine

Pardon the sappy subject line, but after last week’s angry rant it seems right to post some rays (even if they are just very little pinpoints) of good cheer. Life goes on despite every petty act of totalitarianism from every petty politician or bureaucrat — and both real rebellion and creative monkeywrenching appear and grow. —– On the personal front, shortly after I ranted last week, a longtime Commentariat member and friend-I’ve-never-met wrote to remind me, in the nicest way, to follow my own advice. That is: Not to let the bastards grind me (you, us) down. Stupid, evil bastards…

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Dispatches from a small town

Last week the local grocery store was out of toilet paper, hand sanitizer, and disinfectant wipes. Of course. That’s old news. Covid-19 business as usual. The new normal as pundits keep telling us. This week they received new supplies, but when I dropped in Friday they were not only out of the infamous items, but either stripped of or light on dozens of others. Eggs were unavailable. Butter was gone except for a few pricey specialty types at $12 a pound. Yogurt was sparse and only a few gallons of milk remained. Items featured in the week’s sale flyer were…

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Freedom in the time of panic
or
10 small ways to turn crisis lemons into freedom lemonade

I began writing this post after California ‘crats shut down the Bay Area and Governor Jay Inslee of Washington state demanded that all restaurants in his state close their doors except for take-out and delivery. I also began the original version of this post with a fulmination about the insanity of specific measures (“You oldsters stay in your homes and don’t go out even to buy food.” In other words, “We don’t care if you starve for want of helpers to run errands for you; just don’t clutter up our hospitals or disrupt our attempts to make ourselves look like…

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Hysteria Hits the Hinterlands (and a small Friday ramble)

I hit the library yesterday to do some ‘Net surfing and emailing, only to find it “canceled” like so much else. It was open and minimally staffed, but had the air of a haunted house. Patrons could check out and return books, but the banks of library computers were shut down (“until at least March 31,” said the signs), chairs were removed from all the carrels and upturned on the long reading tables, and the ever-present din of children was absent. I never thought I’d miss the shrieks of rugrats, but I did. The place was a freakin’ tomb. They…

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COMPUTER CRASH POST-MORTEM
or
Don’t do what I did

On Tuesday I arrived at the library to send already-composed emails and make a blog post. The laptop wouldn’t boot. Bear Bussjaeger quickly and correctly diagnosed a hard drive problem; the drive was going south, boot sector first. But the real problem wasn’t a dramatic crash of the hard drive. It was more like a slow leak between my ears. This post is to recount where I went wrong, note the very few things I did right, thank the people who saved my backside, and serve as a cautionary tale for anybody out there who might be stumbling into similar…

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Saturday links

Maggie McNeill: The concept of consent should apply to government operatives, as well as freelance molesters, snoops, and sadists. James Howard Kunstler writes an “in memoriam” for reality. Following PayPal’s departure, Mastercard, eBay, and Stripe all depart F*c*b**k’s troubled Libra cryptocurrency project. “Guns and Cannabis: The Insidious Creep of Tyranny” by John Klar. Borepatch and his comment section nail the governmental stupidity of a system that can prevent wildfires only by depriving people of electricity. … Outages the majority of Californians are stubbornly unprepared for. And (also related), Victor Davis Hanson laments, Why have we become so small? (H/T PT)…

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