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Category: Privacy and self ownership

Owning our own information and telling Big Brother to get lost

Saturday links

Maggie McNeill: The concept of consent should apply to government operatives, as well as freelance molesters, snoops, and sadists. James Howard Kunstler writes an “in memoriam” for reality. Following PayPal’s departure, Mastercard, eBay, and Stripe all depart F*c*b**k’s troubled Libra cryptocurrency project. “Guns and Cannabis: The Insidious Creep of Tyranny” by John Klar. Borepatch and his comment section nail the governmental stupidity of a system that can prevent wildfires only by depriving people of electricity. … Outages the majority of Californians are stubbornly unprepared for. And (also related), Victor Davis Hanson laments, Why have we become so small? (H/T PT)…

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Behinder and behinder …

I apologize to all the people to whom I owe either thank yous or emails in general. In the best of times, I can be a slow correspondent, but right now a lot of Life is happening. Nothing bad, I promise. On the contrary. But extracurricular writing is taking up hours upon hours (surprising and pleasant hours) of my time. In between writings, The Wandering Monk and I have been working like hell to turn a quarter acre of weeds and trash into something resembling a real lawn. The Monk has been great, especially considering he’s laboring for free and…

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Civilization: An exercise in 4:00 a.m. thinking

One recent Saturday I slumped under a cloud of doom. “You have nothing left to say. You’re a failure. You might as well close up shop and slink away.” I felt capable only of staring at the walls or losing myself in a Downton Abbey marathon. Even lying down to take a nap seemed like too much effort. Nearly all writers know this mood. It’s often the precursor to a burst of productivity; but when we’re in it, we never see that. When we’re in it, it’s always The End. Sure enough, the next morning I snapped awake at 4:21…

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Perceptions, prejudices, and stumbling ignorantly toward the revolution

This starts as one of my rambles, but trust me, it eventually develops a point. —– I’m reading a book right now in which the author attempts to make an obscure subject user-friendly. She’s so committed to her attempt at popularization that she opens every chapter with an extended movie reference, usually to big-hit or cult-classic films: Captain Kirk did X; Neo did Y; Harry Potter said ABC. Then she ties that in with her subject. It’s an intriguing approach, but almost too cute, too contrived, too insultingly dumbed down. Yet at the same time that she’s attempting to talk…

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Practical freedom tip #432: Teach your children

Part of this week’s wall-building endeavor involved a lawnmower-powered hoist. Like so: Yeah, it looks cumbersome, but it was surprisingly productive and cut the projected time for the job by a full day. The hoist was The Wandering Monk’s work, but powering it with the riding mower was the brainstorm of his minion, a 14-year-old boy from my neighborhood. The mower belongs to his family. When the guys were wrapping up, I requested, “Please ask your mom or dad if I can reimburse them for use of the mower, or at least replace the gas we used.” “Oh, they don’t…

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Tuesday links

Greg Ellifritz over at Active Response Training has some advice for dealing with attacks by multiple perps: Avoid them. In case you can’t, he offers ways to emerge triumphant — or at least not beaten to a pulp. In a sure blow for equal rights, it turns out the Capital One hacker is a woman. She also demonstrated she could be equal in folly to many male hackers, boasting about her exploits online. CapitalOne seems to be handling their massive breach more responsibly than many others. (Equifax, I’m talkin’ to you.) In his inimitable style, James Delingpole cheers the rise…

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Freedom and contentment

The afternoon was hot, so Ava and I decided to go farther than usual, out into the deep woods. It’s cooler there and we still know of one good walking road in the higher hills that hasn’t recently been decreed off limits to the peasants. Locals in the know used to drive a branch of that road all the way up a steep (like 4WD steep) incline to a flat, clearcut spot. There, dense woods gave way to a distant — but sweeping and grand — view of the ocean. No more. Now you can walk, not drive, for about…

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Tuesday links

  • Private business doesn’t need more laws and regulations to deal with pollution.
  • Peter Thiel (who knows something about the CIA, being rather cozy with it), sez the CIA and FBI should investigate Google. Maybe somebody should investigate the FBI, the CIA, and pseudo-libertarian agent of the uber-state Thiel.
  • Just out yesterday: Five good habits to dramatically reduce your chances of dementia (even if you’re genetically predisposed). 5 Comments
  • Friday links

    This is encouraging and I think and hope it’s true: Big tech is dying; they just don’t know it yet. This is pretty encouraging, too. You go, Kiwi gun owners. (H/T DT) Jeffrey Epstein was allowed to skip all his required sex-offender check-ins. Acosta appears to be lying about the sweetheart plea deal he gave Epstein. And Clinton (such a surprise!) lies about his involvement with Epstein, the Lolita Express, and Orgy Island. This is getting interesting. Twitter locked John Lott’s account because he made a factual post about the politics of a murderer. I haven’t been able to find…

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    Tuesday links

    I’m a few days late with the news, but Justin Raimondo has died — and that’s one heck of an obituary for one heck of an activist life. Today’s most unsurprising news: NYPD joins the ranks of police outfits planting evidence to meet arrest quotas. Humboldt County, California, issues peremptory fines to people who might be growing pot — even if they’re actually growing peaches or tomatoes. “The Boomers Ruined Everything.” The title is inflammatory. The article has a point — and a damned good one — but most of the problems it cites preceded us boomers. Our generation only…

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