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Monday links

  • I’ve lost count. How many “anti-violence” activists and “anti-violence” groups have been busted now for weapons violations, assaults, or homicides? A big number.
  • The fedgov can’t manage to charge a single mega-banker for wrecking the U.S. economy through fraud and malfeasance. But the state of New York (via the ever-present, ever-righteous Cyrus Vance, Jr.) can manage 184 counts against a tiny, family-owned bank that was apparently just trying to police itself.
  • Uh oh. No surprise. Sandra Bland, that young woman who “committed suicide” in police custody last week was reportedly a vocal activist against police brutality. Well, guess they showed her, didn’t they?
  • The science behind introversion and extroversion. (Yes, this subject fascinates me; you can tell.)
  • Cannabis may help treat bone fractures. Darn! Why didn’t somebody tell me that two months ago?
  • The house that saved their marriage. Most of us don’t have the resources, but I’ve thought this sort of living arrangement would be great ever since, as a teenager, I read about writer Mary Wollstonecraft, who (clear back in the 18th century) had a similar living arrangement with philosopher William Godwin.
  • The velociraptor poodle?
  • Joel already blogged this one, but it’s too good to pass up. This wannabe robber survived, but if there’s a non-fatal runner-up category for the Darwin Awards, he’s a shoo-in. (I read in another article that, in addition to everything else, the helpful customer was a high school wrestler.)

13 Comments

  1. Pat
    Pat July 20, 2015 5:03 am

    None of the data and testing done on extroverts/introverts has yet told us WHY we are the way we are; their results only confirm what they already know about us. Neurobiological testing tells us what’s happening in the brain, but not what makes introversion/extroversion occur in the first place. So what have they learned?

    Unless the goal is to control the personality – but they know how to do that anyway. See “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest”, and the methods have become both more subtle and more direct since that movie.

  2. MamaLiberty
    MamaLiberty July 20, 2015 7:04 am

    How can one be anti anything if they engage in the same behavior they say they are against? (Don’t answer that… we know they don’t recognize their hypocrisy.) The “anti gun” people use violent rhetoric and make the most violent threats No wonder they are all crazy… cognitive dissonance is a terrible thing.

    As for the velociraptors, I never had any doubt at all that chickens were related to them somehow. 🙂 Only the modern “domesticated” kind are stupid…

  3. Paul Bonneau
    Paul Bonneau July 20, 2015 9:36 am

    I guess I would have to reserve judgement on Safe Streets until I knew more what they are about. As to guns and drugs, what’s wrong with that? 🙂

    A death sentence for an improper lane change? Yet those idiot cops probably will be surprised when the people finally decide to go to war against them.

    Ah, “shoe-in”? Or “shoo-in”? 🙂 I looked up the term, it has quite an interesting background:
    “From a sense of the verb shoo, where racehorses would fall back and allow a chosen rider to win a fixed race.”
    https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/shoo-in

    I never knew there was a verb “shoo”.

  4. Claire
    Claire July 20, 2015 10:06 am

    Shoo-in, shoe-in. Fixed now. So shoe me.

  5. Paul Bonneau
    Paul Bonneau July 20, 2015 10:37 am

    Now I recall “shoo” just means “go” or “get out”. So you can see how “shoo-in” might have become a phrase…

    Why does “shoe” not rhyme with “toe”? The English language is a mess.

    Sorry for being a grammar Nazi (not that I know anything). One of my failings…

  6. RustyGunner
    RustyGunner July 20, 2015 10:46 am

    “The English language is a mess”

    No it’s not, it’s a playground. Embrace the chaos and enjoy!

  7. Claire
    Claire July 20, 2015 10:57 am

    “Sorry for being a grammar Nazi (not that I know anything). One of my failings…”

    Not a failing. I’d rather have you catch me in a goof early on than have a goof be immortalized because nobody smacked me upside the head.

    “Playground.” Harumph. RustyGunner, the English language is indeed a beautifully weird & incredibly useful thing — not to mention that it’s by far the largest & most versatile language on the planet. But this playground sure has a lot of arbitrary rules. 🙂

  8. MamaLiberty
    MamaLiberty July 20, 2015 11:04 am

    “But this playground sure has a lot of arbitrary rules. :-)”

    And Americans are far less enamored of grammar rules than they are of any others, it seems. Even most editors seem to have their own set of rules! I was a member of an editor’s forum for a while, and you wouldn’t believe how nasty they are about it. 🙂

    It’s anarchy, I tell you!!! LOL

    As grammar Nazis go, Paul is a gem, and a darn nice guy.

  9. Bob Adkinson
    Bob Adkinson July 20, 2015 4:08 pm

    I’m always amazed when some ‘scientist’ finds a dinosaur with feathers, and declares he has found a ‘missing link’ between reptiles and chickens. Or he finds a jaw bone, and tries to convince those of us ‘non PhDs’ that they ‘finally’ have ‘the link.’ I’m not a ‘scientist,’ but the arrogance of the ‘intelligentsia’ is a never ending source of entertainment.

  10. jed
    jed July 20, 2015 9:07 pm

    Many years ago, I took a Myers-Briggs test. IIRC, I came out ENTJ, but close to the border of INTJ. Going by the characterizations, I’m more of an INTJ. From that I09 article, I exhibit some characteristics of both, so uh … I dunno. I self-identify as not extroverted. I doubt anyone I know would call me extroverted. But on the continuum, I’m not off on the other end of introverted either.

    The Merriam-Webster online dictionary redirects ‘shoe-in’ to ‘shoo-in’. I only recently ever saw ‘shoe’ used that way, and I suspect it’s a fairly recent phenomenon.

    English becomes less weird when you know more about it, but some of the influences are rather arcane. Some of the odd spellings are the result of early typesetters having no glyphs available for certain letters, and substituting what they could come up with. “gh” is in that category, as a substitute for ‘yogh’. Interesting reading, if you care to pursue it. Toss in corruption of foreign words, imposition of language by conquering outsiders, with the locals developing, sometimes, their own pidgin or creole (I think there’s another category I don’t remember at the moment), and what finally results is indeed quite the amalgamation.

    ESR has written on the subject of English, for those interested in a jumping-off point.

    Just remember, that as ye sew, so shall ye rip!

  11. LarryA
    LarryA July 21, 2015 2:38 pm

    Yesterday I was in the journalism section of the playground, writing up the police report for the local newspaper where I work part-time.

    In the police report we identify where the incidents happen by the block number. If the street address is 2123 it’s the 2100 block. 212 is the 200 block. Then we had one where the street number was 21. What block is that?

    It stumped the whole news staff. (Four people, including me. It’s a weekly.) So last night I mentioned it at my fiction writer critique group. One of the authors dug up “unit block” from somewhere in his memory.

    Yup. Turns out he’s right. http://www.thereporteronline.com/article/RO/20070930/TMP01/309309988

    Learn something every day.

    Back in the day, when I was doing social work, I found out the M-B categorized me as INFP, and that’s pretty accurate.

    I exhibit some characteristics of both, so uh … I dunno.

    Such categorization is more accurate when we’re young, and working mainly on instinct. As we gain experience we learn to use a wider range of skills and methodologies. At least that’s true of those who learn from experience. Nature modified by nurture.

    Picking on a Marine and firefighter is a gross error in victim selection. OTOH the PTB are responding to the Tennessee shooting by telling Marine recruiters not to wear the uniform in public.
    http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/2015/07/18/marine-recruiters-told-not–wear-uniforms-offices-closed/30353587/
    in another article a general explains that soldiers shouldn’t be armed because they’ll have accidents.

    Apparently some Top Men need to read the first chapter of Dummies Guide to Running Government. “Don’t piss on your praetorians.”

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