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10 Comments

  1. Bear
    Bear June 7, 2018 8:33 am

    That’s the first article outside of the gun-osphere I’ve seen that correctly referred to it as a negligent discharge.

    If I drunkenly shot someone in a bar after work, I wonder if they’d let me leave the state without charges.

  2. jc2k
    jc2k June 7, 2018 8:55 am

    Bear – 100% agree – the media calling it an accidental discharge is like fingernails on a chalkboard (though not quite as bad as calling a magazine a clip or a semi-auto an automatic). I’ve been explaining to all my co-workers how there’s no such thing as an accidental discharge – just pure negligence.

    I thought it was pretty classy of the bar to give the victim free drinks for life.

  3. Bear
    Bear June 7, 2018 9:28 am

    jc2k, I’ll allow that there are some accidental discharges. Typically involving equipment failures. The Army is currently dealing with a defect in some 10% of converted M4s that allows the weapon to discharge when the fire selector is moved, without the finger on the trigger. I know a woman whose retention holster broke as she was holstering her pistol; an internal part broke and snagged the trigger.

    Getting drunk, losing one’s sidearm, booger-hooking it when pointed at a person? Gross negligence.

    Attempting to leave scene of the crime afterwards? Definitely moves it to the felony conviction range.

  4. Owl
    Owl June 7, 2018 9:45 am

    ” Bishop Served in the U.S. Army as an Intelligence Officer Prior to Joining the FBI”

    He describes himself as an “intelligence and safety manager.”

    Safety and intelligence? Uhh, yeah. A mind-boggling display of both.

  5. larryarnold
    larryarnold June 7, 2018 9:51 am

    If I drunkenly shot someone in a bar after work, I wonder if they’d let me leave the state without charges.

    And wait until Tuesday to be interviewed? Right.

    The other thing I noticed was that the music was as loud as the gunshot. Ouch.

  6. kentmcmanigal
    kentmcmanigal June 7, 2018 11:57 am

    I admit, with embarrassment, that I once lost a gun from a waistband holster at a bar. Of course, I wasn’t drinking. I wasn’t dancing. And I didn’t shoot the weapon when I picked it up (because I didn’t stick my finger in the trigger guard). I was playing pool at the time, and maybe the repeated bending had pushed it out of the holster without me noticing. However it came to fall out I replaced it– carefully– and apparently no one noticed. And I got a different holster ASAP.

    I’ve said before how I know there are such things as accidental discharges, but I seriously doubt that was one.

  7. Joel
    Joel June 7, 2018 12:21 pm

    The one comment in that article claims prior military acquaintance with Agent of the Dance, and is far from supportive or complimentary.

  8. fred
    fred June 7, 2018 7:28 pm

    Hey,they have a different law for LEO’s,unlike us mundanes.

    Bishop Served in the U.S. Army as an Intelligence Officer Prior to Joining the FBI—A regular ‘Rocket Surgeon’ on that one,LOL!

  9. Jim Brook
    Jim Brook June 8, 2018 8:37 am

    Does this fall under sovereign immunity, like Lon Horiuchi? A fed can be as negligent as he wants while on the job, can’t he?

  10. ellendra
    ellendra June 8, 2018 10:17 am

    “I was playing pool at the time, and maybe the repeated bending had pushed it out of the holster without me noticing. ”

    Repeated bending will do that. When I’m working in the garden, I usually have to stop every 20-30 minutes and re-holster.

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