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Category: Preparedness

Emergency water purification: Which would YOU take?

Okay, preparedness pals. Another question for you. Digging through my emergency supplies for just the right water filtration/purification gear for my revamped bug-out bag, I discover I’ve been excessively paranoid about clean water over the years. I have on hand six different tools for water treatment. Some will stay here among my bug-in supplies, but two will go with the grab-n-go kit. I’ve tested all these on tap water (including the undrinkable tap water down at the Desert Hermitage). I’ve been too paranoid to risk my health for the sake of experiment by applying any of these to mountain streams,…

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Lessons from fury

The other day I mentioned in passing that “official” maps of the danger zones around Mt. St. Helens were so misleading that they probably got people killed. Indeed, I’ve learned since that they did. In fact, almost everybody killed in the 1980 eruption was in an area that government agencies had officially designated as “safe” — despite evidence to the contrary. My comment came in a post about tsunami preparedness and “official” maps that I’ve chosen not to trust. First off, I want to say that I think “official” map makers usually do their honest best. But at best there’s…

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Garage sales shall provide

I’ve mentioned before that I’m not exactly an optimist or a believer in positive thinking. But there is one area of my life where all I have to do is set something in my mind and I can be amazingly sure that serendipity will provide. I’m talking about garage sales. I cannot believe the number of times I’ve fixed some item in my brain only to have it turn up at a garage sale within a few weeks — even if it’s an item I’ve never seen at a garage sale before. Really tough items might take six months or…

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Bug-out backpack recommendations, vacuum sealers

In the comments section on bug-out bag contents, several posters insisted that a backpack — not a suitcase or a rolling cart or a plastic tub — was absolutely essential equipment. While I’m not 1000 percent persuaded that absolutely everybody must have a backpack (and I don’t think anybody should allow lack of a backpack to stop them from assembling a kit), I can definitely see the point. Commenter Adam Selene posed a question: “For those of you who advocate for backpacks, can you suggest any actual brands and models?” I think it’s worth bringing that question up more visibly.…

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The trouble with advice, pink guns, thank you, and other stuff

The trouble with advice … is that when you ask for it, people give it! I mean, that’s the good thing about advice, too. But it goes both ways. On Tuesday when I asked for tips on what to add to my reconstituted grab-and-go kit (which sounds so much more respectable than a bug-out bag), you were your usual generous and informative selves. You helped me and potentially helped hundreds or thousands of strangers who might google upon that blog entry one day. Of course, you also twisted my brain into a pretzel and will probably scare the heck out…

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Rethinking a bug-out bag

Yesterday I wrote about why I’m re-creating my bug-out bag. it needs to be renewed for a scenario I’ve never faced before. Today I promised I’d list the “ingredients” in the bag and welcome your suggestions. You’ve already made some good ones in the comments to yesterday’s blog. While putting together the new kit, I poked around online to refine my ideas. One thing that struck me immediately is that there is no “right” bug-out bag or grab-and-go kit. Some are geared toward hardcore outdoor survival. Others seem more geared to getting you adjusted to conditions in a shelter. Yet…

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Rethinking a bug-out

I spent most of this weekend updating my emergency preparations, with an eye especially to earthquake and tsunami preparedness. Like most of you, I’ve always had a bug-out bag — a grab-and-go kit — around the house. But I realized as I worked yesterday that I never took those kits completely seriously. Thing is, I didn’t believe I’d need to bug out. Until now, I’ve mostly lived in the sort of places other people would bug out to. Cabin Sweet Cabin was high on a hill outside of a small town (and was probably the most earthquake-safe structure in the…

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Okay, Chicken Little. But …

It would take most readers of this blog about 10 seconds to spot 10 egregious problems with this so-called news item. It’s unthinking, uncritical, hysterical newscasting at its worst. But once we’ve gotten that out of the way … However irresponsible it may be to report without fact-checking that “supermoons” and fish kills mean an earthquake is going to hit the West Coast in the next week, why not use this moment to our benefit? If we live on the West Coast we know we’re going to get an earthquake — a giant one — sometime. Some people are betting…

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Thursday miscellany

Read this account of an Anonymous hacker with a full shaker of salt at hand, says C^2. It’s interesting, but you do get the feeling the author took everything in uncritically. I’ll bet every dog lover already knows this. (NY Times free subscription link.) But this display of loyalty amid disaster might still surprise — and bring a tear. (Tip o’ hat to P.T.) And from Jim B. in a recent comment section: very cool temporary shelter.

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