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Category: Resistance

Sometimes you need to say “no” to Big Brother

I’m suffering an attack of optimism

I’m suffering the sudden onset of optimism. Don’t worry, the condition probably won’t be fatal or chronic. I’ll be back to my normal, healthy, pessimistic self in a week or two. But meanwhile I can’t get rid of this feeling that everything may turn out okay out there in the world. Well, not everything. But outcomes of the current madness may be better than we expect. I feel this way precisely because everything’s falling apart. And all kinds of people are recognizing that everything’s falling apart or has already fallen and can’t be raised back up. That’s the part that…

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A freedomista symbiosis for our future? Part II

I just re-read Rod Dreher’s FAQ on the Benedict Option. I love it. Although Dreher is talking exclusively to Christians (though inclusively among varieties of Christians), there’s a lot there for the rest of us, as well. He opens with a quote from his inspiration, social critic and historian Alasdair MacIntyre, that says in part: A crucial turning point in that earlier history occurred when men and women of good will turned aside from the task of shoring up the Roman imperium and ceased to identify the continuation of civility and moral community with the maintenance of that imperium. What…

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Anybody want to ‘fess up to this? Anybody read it?

I’m working on the conclusion to last week’s Freedomista symbiosis blog. With luck you’ll see it tomorrow or Wednesday. Meanwhile, walking to town to clear my brain and organize my thoughts, I picked this up at the post office: It looks like an intriguing and maybe instructive book. It’s in great shape. It even came with a handwritten note from the seller, thanking me effusively (with exclamation points and red underlines) for the order. Except I didn’t. Order it, that is. The one thing it didn’t come with was a note naming the giver. It’s clearly from someone who already…

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A freedomista symbiosis for our future? Part I

And so our “awkward stage” continues. The awkward stage is that excruciatingly, endlessly frustrating phase in which tyranny, brutality, and bigotry against freedom grow ever more oppressive but the oppressed feel powerless to act effectively on a large scale. Moral though it may be to string lawless, dictatorial rulers up on lamp posts, it isn’t what good people do — at least not until provocations and deprivations exceed endurance. Yet without effective options, we good people find ourselves ever more bound and restricted. In the 25 years since I opened 101 Things to do ‘Til the Revolution with my infamous…

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Working on the next blogosaurus, Jimmy Buffett style

I’m working on the next blogosaurus. The topic will be the symbiosis in hard times between those freedomistas who retreat (Galt’s Gulch style, monastic-style, solo, or within everyday communities) and those who fight. Their relationship may not be easy or even always mutually respectful, but it is symbiotic — and necessary. Meanwhile, I had company for a week and my houseguest courteously brought unseasonably warm and dry weather. We brainstormed this topic one morning and I paused for an hour that day to make notes. But mostly this was the background to the week’s intellectual labors: All we lacked was…

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IN PRAISE OF MEN, Part VII:
Ten reasons good men matter in good times and bad

Previous posts: Part I, II, III, IV, V, VI —– Men are aggressive, predatory, competitive, rough, sex-obsessed, unruly, stymied by complex emotions, self-important, prone to violence, and domineering. Does that apply to all men? Hell no. As I said early on in this series, I’m going to make a lot of general statements. Generally, historically and biologically, the above statements are true. Your mileage — or your husband’s, son’s, nephew’s, father’s or best friend’s — may vary. But these messy traits are part of the human male character — along with loyalty, focus, protectiveness, assertiveness, directness, courage, physical strength, logic,…

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This time, it might really be different

A remarkable series of events culminated in at least one major Wall Street hedge fund on the verge of insolvency and widespread anxiety and even panic from the titans of the financial system.
— Glenn Greenwald

—–

Silver here. Claire asked me to comment on the GameStop short squeeze debacle.

It’s early, what’s happening is complex, and there are multiple players and multiple levels. These are my first impressions, but the rebellion of small investors against hedge fund billionaires could be a milestone in the rebirth of freedom.

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Where there’s Internet, there’s hope
(plus an invitation)

The news is dire, depressing, infuriating, terrifying, ominous, twisted, biased, and generally panic-inducing. As always. Okay, it’s more than usually ominous lately, what with the country rather suddenly being ruled by a coalition of pandering post-Alzheimers proponents of the old order and a whole new class of juvenile Masters of the Universe. The flick-of-a-switch “disappearing” of Parler and our then-present president from the ‘Net finally rattled us in a way that previous censorship, deplatforming, demonetizing, Twitter mobs, and disappearances of lesser ‘Net operations could not. Scary, scary, scary, scary, scary. BUT. Have you noticed that activist ‘Netizens (that good old…

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The Quality of a Free Man

This is a reprint of an article I wrote back in the late 90s or early oughts. It’s part one of a four-part series, all of which are available to full members of The Living Freedom Forums. Despite being some of my best writing and thinking, neither this piece nor the series, called Sustainable Freedom, ever received much circulation or comment. I’m resurrecting it because it matters to me and to some of the most important people in my life — and still matters more than ever in reality. Also because my friend “Tex” referred to it in his quotes…

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Fear and loathing in the hinterlands, part II

A small sign of the times The town at the foot of the hill had a crisis last week. It didn’t have to be a crisis. It began as a mere glitch — human caused, but easily human reparable, too. The city expected a contractor to notify residents of several streets about a planned water outage. The contractor didn’t do it. When residents quite naturally began contacting city hall (aka the water company), city mucky-mucks proceeded to make things infinitely worse. They spent an hour pointing fingers (“It’s the contractor’s fault! We have nothing to do with it! They lied…

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